Veterans Day 2013

Flag

At Whiskey Catholic we would like to take a brief moment to thank the men and women who are currently serving or who have served in the armed forces.  So many in this country take their sacrifice for granted and far too many veterans did not receive the welcome they deserved after serving our country in combat. There are two current events which give us pause for reflection on this Veterans Day.

First, the hostility that the Archdiocese for the Military Services (“AMS”) is receiving from the administration and fringe leftest Catholics should give us cause to take a moment to pray for Archbishop Broglio and Catholic chaplains serving around the world.  Such secularists would rather have the AMS withdraw from its critical ministerial capacity, leaving our men to die on the battlefield without the graces of the sacraments, than risk the political incorrectness of priests in uniform upholding objective truth.  The fringe leftest Catholic opposition to the AMS fares no better.  Catholics who would have those in the military die on the battlefield without the aid of the sacraments put their own animosity toward the nation’s military above the souls entrusted by Christ to the Church.

If you did not make a donation to the AMS during the national collection (Nov. 9-10), please consider doing so today.

Second, this year marked the last Doolittle Toast, a tribute paid by veterans of the Doolittle raid to their fallen brothers.  Only four survivors of the raid remain, the youngest of which is 92.  We will not have WWII veterans with us much longer, and with their passing the nation will lose an entire generation of men who understood the magnitude of evil a tyranny could accomplish.  Our current generation may not have the memory necessary to be vigilant for encroaching secular tyranny, but the latest news out of New York City, that Catholics studying medicine could be forced to perform abortions as part of their training and that pregnancy crises centers could be closed for refusing to offer abortions, should make Catholics consider where we stand as a nation.

Pray for our veterans.

“May we remember that the freedoms we enjoy in our most gracious home, the United States of America, did not come without a price. May the Lord bless all those who served, all those who continue to serve, and the families that those serving left behind. May we never forget. O God, by whose mercy the faithful departed find rest, look kindly on your departed veterans who gave their lives in the service of their country. Grant that through the passion, death, and resurrection of your Son they may share in the joy of your heavenly kingdom and rejoice in you with your saints forever. We ask this through Christ our Lord.”

Comments are closed.